Links

Links

In this section you will find links to numerous helpful resources in the area of Natural Resource Management. The linked sites cover a wide range of subject matter and have a wealth of information.

Regional Natural Resource Management Planning for Climate Change Fund
Action on the Ground
Australian National Register of Emission Units
Carbon Farming Initiative:
CFI non-Kyoto Fund
CFI project application and registration
Indigenous Carbon Farming Fund
List of companies with a liability under the Clean Energy Futures Legislation- Liable Entities Public Information Database
Projects within the scope of the CFI, with links to the positive and negative lists, and guidelines for rainfall and dry land salinity mitigation

ABC Rural
Farm Mags

Link to the Australian Farm Journal and Australian Landcare Magazine.

FarmOnline

Inside you'll find dedicated web content as well as articles sourced from Australia's leading rural newspapers and magazines on industry and lifestyle issues affecting rural Australia. From agricultural news, weather, classifieds and market reports to properties for sale, job vacancies and rural events, farmonline has it covered.

FarmOnline

Articles on industry and lifestyle issues affecting rural Australia including agricultural news, weather, classifieds and market reports to properties for sale, job vacancies and rural events.

Mulga Line

The Mulga Line is a newsletter that contains articles from the Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries, Department of Natural Resources and Water and South West NRM Ltd.

The Local Government Reform Commission has provided its recommendations on changes to local government in Queensland.

The Report of the Local Government Reform Commission is provided in two sections:

ABC TV Education resources

This link will take you to the Education Resources site of ABC television. As well as offering many programs suitable for in-class learning,the ABC provides information on topics such as Australia’s Fossil History and Salinity.

Outback Gondwana Foundation

Each year, OGF offers 1 or 2 places at the Eromanga Dinosaur Project’s digs for an Earth Sciences student interested in gaining paleontological field experience.

Currently this is a service that OGF provides to help further the science and provide an opportunity for these students. The only costs they would need to meet is a daily meal cost.

Please note that preference for these students will be given to local students from the SWQ region. Should you need any more information for this, we would be happy to provide what we can.

SLATS land cover change reports

The Land cover change in Queensland—Statewide Landcover and Trees Study 2008–09 report (PDF, 1.8M)* (SLATS report) provides statistics on tree clearing rates in Queensland. It covers the second full annual period since the Queensland Government ended broadscale remnant clearing on 31 December 2006.

The 2008–09 figures represent the lowest annual rate of clearing since the Statewide Landcover and Trees Study began in 1988.

Clearing rates for the 2008–09 period were 99 940 hectares per year (ha/yr). This demonstrates a decrease of 19 per cent from the 2007–08 clearing rate of 123 000 ha/yr, and a total decrease of 67 per cent since 31 December 2006.

The supplementary  report— Analysis of Woody Vegetation Clearing Rates in Queensland (PDF, 234K)* —provides a breakdown of all clearing trends identified in the 2008–09 SLATS report.

For example, the government’s commitment to end broadscale clearing included a goal to reduce clearing-related greenhouse gas emissions by 20–25 mega tonnes (Mt) per year.

The supplementary report shows a significant reduction in the rate of emissions from clearing since that commitment was made in 2003, down from 60 Mt per year to approximately 17 Mt per year—a total decrease of more than 43 Mt, or 72 per cent.

The analysis also indicates the majority of all reported clearing was likely to be for routine activities including clearing for fire breaks, fencing, roads and infrastructure, and for permitted activities such as fodder harvesting.

Atlas of Living Australia

The Atlas of Living Australia is a five-year project funded under the Australian Government's National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS). Its mission is to develop a biodiversity data management system which will link Australia’s biological knowledge with its scientific and agricultural reference collections and other custodians of biological information.

Council of Australian Governments water reform

Details on the Murray-Darling Basin Agreement delivered by COAG on the 26th of March 2008.

CSIRO
Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
Department of Infrastructure & Planning NEW WEBSITE
Department of the Environment and Heritage
Environmental Stewardship Programme

The Environmental Stewardship Programme is a new Australian Government initiative that will focus on the long-term protection, rehabilitation and improvement of targeted environmental assets on private land or impacted by activities conducted on private land, including freehold and leasehold. The Stewardship Programme will be jointly administered by the Minister for the Environment and Water Resources and the Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry.

Land Water & Wool

New tools to help Australian Woolgrowers earn more and farm sustainably. Land, Water & Wool comprises seven areas of research and development based around the major issues facing sustainable wool production:

LATEST WATER STATISTICS NOW AVAILABLE TO QUEENSLANDERS

LATEST WATER STATISTICS NOW AVAILABLE TO QUEENSLANDERS Water Minister Craig Wallace announced that up-to-the-hour water monitoring information is now available to Queenslanders via the internet.

National Action Plan for Salinity and Water Quality
National Agricultural Monitoring System

The National Agricultural Monitoring System (NAMS) contains a range of climatic and production information, for dryland/broadacre and irrigated industries, for over 600 regions throughout Australia.

National Land and Water Resources Audit
Natural Heritage Trust (Federal)
Nature Refuge Funding

Nature refuges help landholders protect Queensland's significant natural and cultural landscape, wildlife values and biodiversity while allowing sustainable production to continue. To find out more call 1800 603 604 or www.epa.qld.gov.au/naturerefuge (refresh)

One Plan

OnePlan is part of the Queensland Government's Blueprint for the Bush, a 10-year plan to build a sustainable, liveable and prosperous rural Queensland. It is a new framework that makes it easier for landholders to prepare property management plans that are already required by government. OnePlan does not introduce new requirements for landholders. For more information the department has developed the following list of frequently asked questions and answers.

State Rural Leashold Land Strategy

The State Rural Leasehold Land Strategy which will come into effect in early 2008 provides a framework for the sustainable use of rural leasehold land. It guides the management of leasehold land—particularly that defined as rural leasehold land—and documents the changes and challenges to managing it. The Department of Natural Resources and Water (NRW,) Agforce Queensland, and the Australian Rainforest Conservation Society collaborated in developing the strategy, taking into account the aspirations of leaseholders, conservation and Indigenous groups and the rural industry.

WaterShed
WetlandInfo

WetlandInfo is a comprehensive information website for anyone with an interest in the management, protection, conservation, research or study of wetlands in Queensland. Developed by the Queensland Wetlands Programme it’s designed to help groups such as landholders, regional bodies and industry in making decisions about wetland management. The website contains: maps and data to show where the wetlands are and an inventory of available information on their physical, chemical and biological attributes; a range of materials and tools to support wetlands assessment, management, rehabilitation and monitoring; the best available wetland science in a range of formats; tools to help decision-makers access and understand legislation that impacts on land use in relation to Queensland wetlands; and education tools for landholders, students, teachers and volunteers.

Australian Conservation Foundation

Older students will benefit from a visit to the Australian Conservation Foundation’s website. The Publications section contains current information on the some of the most controversial environmental issues facing Australia today.

Australian Department of Environment and Heritage

The Australian Department of Environment and Heritage produces a Teacher’s Resource Kit every year aimed at 6 – 12 year olds, focused on Australia’s threatened species.

Australian Government Department of Environment and Heritage – Sustainable Schools

There is an emerging focus on sustainability in schools and teachers can find information about what sustainability means, and the networks that exist, at this website. The website also includes information on international sustainability.

Brighter Prospects: Enhancing the Resilience of Australia.

Brian Walker explains in his foreword that: 'The essays are an eclectic mix, chosen to cover a range of issues in which resilience plays a central role. They are not intended to be a complete or definitive set, but collectively they raise the issues that Australia needs to address, at all levels of society, if we are to develop along a trajectory of non-declining human wellbeing. I commend this volume to all those with an interest in Australia's future'. Aspects of resilience covered relate to climate change (written by Paul Barratt), bioscurity (Stephn Prowse), peak oil (Ian Dunlop), population health (Richard Eckersley), the global economy (Nick Gruen and John Quiggin), ecosystem resilience (Steve Cork).

CarbonLink

CarbonLink is a private Australian company owned by educators, scientists and entrepreneurs whose desire is to improve the planet by reducing atmospheric CO2 while improving the lot of our food producers. The company has been established to provide services in the international carbon trading marketplace. CarbonLink is focusing on the role of soil in sequestering carbon from the atmosphere to offset our emissions and reduce our carbon footprint.

CarbonLink

CarbonLink is a private Australian company owned by educators, scientists and entrepreneurs whose desire is to improve the planet by reducing atmospheric CO2 while improving the lot of our food producers. The company has been established to provide services in the international carbon trading marketplace. CarbonLink is focusing on the role of soil in sequestering carbon from the atmosphere to offset our emissions and reduce our carbon footprint.

Climate Change Impacts and Adaptations

A branch of the Australian Government's Department of Climate Change website, focusing on the impacts of climate change and neccessary adaptations to these impacts.

Climate Change in Queensland: What the Science is Telling Us

The latest assessment of potential negative impacts from climate change shows Queensland has much to lose if current projections are realised. This information was recently released in the report, Climate Change in Queensland: What the Science is Telling Us, compiled by the Queensland Government’s Office of Climate Change. The report shows Queensland is particularly vulnerable to climate change because: • many of our important sectors (agriculture, tourism) are climate-dependent; • most of our population lives on the coast and are at risk from more extreme weather and rising sea levels; and • our ecologically rich areas, such as the Great Barrier Reef and Wet Tropics, are vulnerable to a significant loss of biodiversity.

Concepts for private sector fund conservation using tax effective instruments
CSIRO School Program

CSIRO schoolprograms support primary and secondary science education. Students can visit CSIRO Science Education Centres or join the Double Helix Club to get more involved in science.

Desert Knowledge Australia - Regional Video Network

Desert Knowledge Australia has established a Regional Video Network for people to meet every 6 weeks via a video conference to share ideas, information and issues common across desert Australia and to explore opportunities for collaboration.

Environmental Protection Agency and Queensland Parks and Wildlife Services

Go to this address to access Cyber Rangers, an interactive website for school students. From this page, students can also explore the information provided on the site, which includes an A-Z wildlife listing.

Farm Life Forum

Discuss all things farming with people from Australia and New Zealand.

Greening Australia Qld
Griffith News Article- Griffith Leads Climate Change Adaptation

An article from the Griffith News website of Griffith University.

International River Foundation

Welcome to the website of the International Riverfoundation! We are a leading advocate and catalyst for the protection and restoration of the world’s rivers. We were established in 2003 as an independent not-for-profit organisation in response to the critical state of many of the world’s rivers.

International River Foundation

Welcome to the website of the International Riverfoundation! We are a leading advocate and catalyst for the protection and restoration of the world’s rivers. We were established in 2003 as an independent not-for-profit organisation in response to the critical state of many of the world’s rivers.

Land Water & Wool

New tools to help Australian Woolgrowers earn more and farm sustainably. Land, Water & Wool comprises seven areas of research and development based around the major issues facing sustainable wool production:

Landcare Australia
Landcare Australia Limited

 Visit the Landcare Australia website to read about practical ways that schools are involved in Landcare activities. The site also includes information about Junior Landcare Grants and links to state based resources.

Landcare Queensland Virtual Bookstore
National Agricultural Monitoring System

The National Agricultural Monitoring System (NAMS) contains a range of climatic and production information, for dryland/broadacre and irrigated industries, for over 600 regions throughout Australia.

National Agricultural Monitoring System

The National Agricultural Monitoring System (NAMS) contains a range of climatic and production information, for dryland/broadacre and irrigated industries, for over 600 regions throughout Australia.

Native Vegetation Regional Management

This guide was prepared to assist strategic level planning and management of native vegetation at the catchment and regional scale, with particular consideration given to integrated natural resource management. It is structured around five major questions of interest to regional managers, which are discussed in the section ‘How do I use this document?’ This guide is a resource manual, not a sequential ‘how to’ recipe for managing native vegetation. It is therefore designed so that you can dip in and out of the report, rather than having to read it from front to back.

Natural Resource Management in Australia
One Plan

OnePlan is part of the Queensland Government's Blueprint for the Bush, a 10-year plan to build a sustainable, liveable and prosperous rural Queensland. It is a new framework that makes it easier for landholders to prepare property management plans that are already required by government. OnePlan does not introduce new requirements for landholders. For more information the department has developed the following list of frequently asked questions and answers.

Primary Schools: Free Resources for Teacher

This website links to many organisations that provide free resources to teachers, in anumber of subject areas, including Environmental Education. Topics currently covered include Energy and Climate Change, Land Use, Oceans, Water Quality Management, and Wildlife.

Queensland Department of Natural Resources and Water

Visit the Department website for a current listing of resources available for schools. The list includes topics such as Catchment Management, Water Cycles and Dung Beetles, and each topic is aimed at particular levels and subject areas.

Queensland Department of Natural Resources and Water

Visit the Department website for a current listing of resources available for schools. The list includes topics such as Catchment Management, Water Cycles and Dung Beetles, and each topic is aimed at particular levels and subject areas.

Queensland Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries

 Queensland’s AgAware project helps students gain insight into agriculture in Australia. Seven modules, which incorporate Queensland core learning outcomes, are available. The Department provides a suite of other resources, including brochures, booklets and posters.

Regional Groups Collective
Regional NRM
Threatened Species community grants

The Minister has announced the Threatened Species community grants and additional funding of $550,000. You can find the relevant projects for Qld at the following website. If you have any queries regarding any of the projects please contact the TSN Coordinator for Qld, details below: Rebecca Richardson Threatened Species Network Qld WWF-Australia Tel: +61 7 3012 7574 Email: rrichardson@wwf.org.au

Triple Helix Consulting

Triple Helix Consulting works with progressive organisations in the public and private sectors to develop and implement more sustainable policies and practises. The 'triple helix' is Andrew Campbell's metaphor for sustainability-the intertwined and interdependent strands of landscapes, lifestyles and livelihoods.

Up To Me

Are you concerned about the environment and the effects of climate change, but think it is such a big issue that you can't do anything about it? Think again. Up2me is about making easy changes in your personal life to live more sustainably, to commit to using fewer resources and to leaving a smaller ecological footprint on the Earth

Weeds CRC "Weed Warriors"

The Weeds CRC encourages the involvement of children in tackling weeds in Australia. The website is student-friendly and focuses on hands-on learning about invasive pest plants. Schools can also join up as “Weed Warriors”.

Wildlife Friendly Fencing

The wildlife friendly fencing project is raising awareness of the impact of barbed wire and netting on Australian wildlife, especially bats, birds and gliders, and developing guidelines for good practice. More than 70 wildlife species have been identified in Australia as occasional or regular victims of barbed wire fences. Each year thousands of these animals face a cruel death or permanent injuries from entanglement. Many of the survivors are euthanased as they are unreleasable. Barbed wire is both an animal welfare and conservation issue, as it is now being recognised as a threatening process in the draft / recovery plans for a number of species. These include the Yellow-bellied glider (Petaurus australis), the Magogany glider (Petaurus gracilis), the Spectacled flying fox (Pteropus conspicillatus) and Grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalis).

Biosecurity DPI

Biosecurity Queensland came into operation on 1 March 2007. Bringing together the biosecurity resources and functions of Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries (DPI&F), Department of Natural Resources and Water (NRW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Biosecurity Queensland is responsible for coordinating the Government’s efforts to prevent, prepare, investigate, respond and recover from pest and diseases that threaten the economy and the environment. Biosecurity Queensland brings together land protection, animal and plant biosecurity, environmental biosecurity, chemical use and animal welfare and keeping. Working with our partners, Biosecurity Queensland will seek to reduce the risk of pests, diseases and chemicals entering and spreading through the Queensland food and fibre chain and natural environment.

Biosecurity Queensland

Biosecurity Queensland came into operation on 1 March 2007. Bringing together the biosecurity resources and functions of Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries (DPI&F), Department of Natural Resources and Water (NRW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Biosecurity Queensland is responsible for coordinating the Government’s efforts to prevent, prepare, investigate, respond and recover from pest and diseases that threaten the economy and the environment.

Biosecurity Queensland brings together land protection, animal and plant biosecurity, environmental biosecurity, chemical use and animal welfare and keeping. Working with our partners, Biosecurity Queensland will seek to reduce the risk of pests, diseases and chemicals entering and spreading through the Queensland food and fibre chain and natural environment.

Biosecurity Video & Audio Files

"These audios and videos are a great reminder of what landholders and travelling farm workers should be considering when it comes to positive biosecurity practices. They provide basic tips, actions and details on where to get more information," said Chief Veterinary officer, Dr Andy Carroll.

Click here for link to video files

Pest Animal Portal

Pest Portal Under NHT’s National Feral Animal Control Program, the Bureau of Rural Sciences has supported the Pest Animal Control CRC in cooperation with the University of Canberra to develop a website on pest animals. The site aims to make information on past and current research readily accessible.

Review of the impacts of gambusia, redfin perch, tench, roach, yellowfin goby and streaked goby in Australia are sought from interested parties

The Australian continent contains a large number of endemic fish species that contribute to the relatively high and unique biodiversity of our aquatic ecosystems. This means that Australian fish fauna are vulnerable to the impacts of alien fish invasions. Several Australian studies have expressed concern over the potential impact of a number of alien fish species on native fish and aquatic habitats. If these species were to spread, like the common carp (Cyprinus carpio), they too could create significant environmental, economic and health hazards. This report provides a comprehensive review of the six species: Gambusia; redfin perch; tench; roach; yellowfin goby and streaked goby. The purpose of the review is to bring together all the information relevant to the impacts of individual species and to identify gaps in knowledge. Comments on the draft report are sought from interested parties. The Department is particularly interested in receiving submissions that provide additional scientifically robust data or information which would improve the current report. Comments must be received by close of business Friday 18 July 2008, and sent to: Director Invasive Species Section Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts GPO Box 787, CANBERRA ACT 2601 Fax: 02 6274 1332 Email: invasive_species@environment.gov.au

The Geological Survey of Queensland (GSQ) as part of the Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI), has a new web site.

The new links are:

 

DEEDI http://www.deedi.qld.gov.au/ - you will find links to Mines and Energy in the Queensland industries box

Mining and safety http://mines.industry.qld.gov.au/default.htm - links to our online services are on the right hand side of the page

GSQ http://mines.industry.qld.gov.au/geoscience/about-gsq.htm - GSQ contacts

Geoscience products and services http://mines.industry.qld.gov.au/geoscience/products-services.htm

 

Please update your favourites accordingly. Any saved links to the old dme site need to be updated as this site will be turned off in July.

The direct links to IRTM and QDEX have not changed.

 

If you have any queries or problems with the new site please contact me.

cheers

Sharon Beeston 
Information Management Officer & CLO
Geoscience Information 
Geological Survey of Queensland
Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation 
Level 10, 119 Charlotte St Brisbane QLD 4000
PO Box 15216 City East QLD 4002 

Phone07 3035 5257  
Fax  07 3003 1541
Email  sharon.beeston@deedi.qld.gov.au

Customer Service Centre13 25 23
www.deedi.qld.gov.au

Weeds Australia

An Australian Weeds Committee National Initiative

Department of Infrastructure & Planning

Queensland DIP has a new website with a range of relevant NRM information ((provide more targeted links?))

DERM fact sheets for grader field days

These fact sheets were prepared by Bruce Carey in DERM to incorporate the information from Darryl Hill’s Grader field days as well as many other publications on the topic produced in the last 30 years.

The Queensland Landcare web site has some relatively new pages about achieving soil conservation in Queensland
  • A pictorial presentation titled Achieving soil conservation in Queensland with over 200 photos to tell the story –it is a 25MB file so it may take a minute to download depending on your internet connection
  • A written account of the history of soil conservation in Qld
  • Three Queensland based historical  videos on Youtube – Soil is your future (1956), Soil – There’s plenty of it isn’t there?(1982) and Down to Earth (1992)
  • Links to Queensland government web pages about soil erosion.
Wind Erosion Factsheet

Here is a link to a fact sheet DERM has prepared on wind erosion.  http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/factsheets/pdf/land/l259.pdf Hopefully it will help to improve people's understanding of the issue and should answer a few questions when we get the next dust storm. 

Thanks to all of the people who had an input into its preparation

 

Bruce Carey

Senior Natural Resources Officer

Science Strategy and Integration

Department of Environment and Resource Management

Ecosciences Precinct

Telephone: 07 3170 5763  Facsimile: 07 3170 5801

Email: bruce.carey@derm.qld.gov.au

Location: Lvl 3, Block B West, 41 Boggo Rd, Dutton Park

Address:GPO Box 2454, Qld 4001

Learning the hard way: Australia's policies to reduce emissions - A Grattan Report

Because Australian governments have introduced more than 300 programs to tackle climate change since Australia signed the Kyoto Protocol in 1997, we can assess the evidence of what works and what does not in reducing carbon emissions. The evidence shows that what reduces emissions most effectively and cheaply is the creation of a market.

In this report, Grattan Institute analyses these 300 programs and finds that three market-based schemes have produced 40 per cent of Australia’s emissions reductions since 1997 (excluding once-off land clearing). This is easily the largest reduction in emissions induced by any mechanism government has tried.

By contrast, $7 billion worth of grant-tendering schemes – upfront grants to companies for proposals to reduce emissions – have done very little to reduce greenhouse pollution. Governments have also spent $5 billion on rebate programs to encourage the purchase of low-emission products. Again, the impact on emissions has been minimal.

A fourth kind of program – energy efficiency standards – can reduce emissions cheaply and effectively, but these are limited in scope. Based on experience, only a market-based model can meet Australia’s 2020 target, endorsed by both main political parties, of reducing annual emissions to five per cent below 2000 levels.

Map of referable wetlands

New concurrence role for Great Barrier Reef wetland protection areas 

The department has new concurrence powers for wetlands of high ecological significance within the Great Barrier Reef catchments. These areas have been identified as ‘wetland protection areas’ on the map of referable wetlands.

Native Seeds

Native Seeds Pty Ltd is an Australian company specialising in growing and selling high quality seed of a range of Australian native grasses. The company has exclusive licences to many specially selected Australian native grass species and types that can be used in a variety of applications including lawns.

New smartphone app for growers and producers

Funded by groups like the GRDC and MLA and available for free, the 'CliMate' app shows graphs comparing rainfall from past years, and gives growers a probability of how much rain will fall in the future.

New wild dog PestSmart fact sheet

With a focus on laws and regulations in Australia relating to wild dogs, a new PestSmart fact sheet from the Invasive Animals CRC explains wild dog management legislation and policy often vary between jurisdictions at local and state levels, with overriding federal laws also affecting wild dog management.

The fact sheet details the following types of regulations that should be considered before beginning any wild dog management activity:

Legal obligations on owners of land where wild dogs occur
The responsibility to manage wild dogs rests largely with the owners or managers of the land where wild dogs occur. In places where wild dogs are considered pests, landowners have a responsibility to control wild dogs on their land and prevent them from causing problems on neighbouring lands.
Laws relating to animal welfare
People managing wild dogs are obligated to use control methods that minimise any potential pain, fear or distress. Codes of practice, standard operating procedures and best-practice guidelines for the management of wild dogs have been developed, are publically available and should be followed in order to prevent cruelty to animals during control operations.
Laws relating to land tenure
In many cases, wild dogs are a ‘protected species’ in national parks and conservation reserves while they are considered ‘declared pests’ in many livestock production areas.
Laws relating to the conservation status of specific wild dog populations
Controlling all wild dogs may be allowed along the boundaries of some conservation reserves, while core areas within a reserve may be set aside for wild dog conservation. An isolated island population (such as dingoes on Fraser Island) might be considered a unique natural asset worthy of conservation. Alternatively, people might want to only conserve pure dingoes but eliminate impure hybrids and feral dogs.
Laws relating to the use of specific control techniques
There is specific legislation dealing with the use of firearms, which are often used to euthanise wild dogs in trapping or shooting programs. Various laws also govern the use of poisons and other veterinary drugs used to kill or safely handle wild dogs. Many of these chemicals have label instructions and directions for use that are legally binding.
Laws relating to the use of animals for research and teaching
Some wild dog management activities might be considered ‘research and teaching activities’ in some jurisdictions, such as the systematic use of infra-red trail cameras or attaching tracking collars to wild dogs. If this is the case, various additional permits and approvals may be required before management activities can begin.
Laws relating to the keeping, sale, and movement of wild dogs
Different states and territories may or may not allow the keeping of wild dogs as pets. A permit may be required to do so. Wild dogs may be seized and euthanised if they are being kept illegally.
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
All new wild dog control programs must be reviewed under the EPBC Act before they are put in place, to assess the program’s risk to threatened species in the area.

Wild dogs are identified by the national Vertebrate Pests Committee as a ‘Category 5 / Extreme’ species. Category 5 means that the animal is a recognised pest that is both widespread and established, while an Extreme classification indicates that such animals should not be allowed to enter, nor be kept in any state or territory without permission. Wild dogs are also identified as a pest animal under the Australian Pest Animal Strategy.

Greater level of detail can also be found in state and local wild dog management plans, which can be accessed at www.feral.org.au. The fact sheet can be downloaded from www.feral.org.au/wild-dog-policy-and-legislation

Pest Smart Fact Sheets

PestSmart Publications

The Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre Community Awareness Survey (CAS) has pioneered a new technique in opinion research called ‘Reading the Public Mind’ (RtPM). http://www.feral.org.au/community-awareness-survey/

PestSmart Factsheet: Have you got wild dogs?Fact sheet on detecting the presence of wild dogs. http://www.feral.org.au/have-you-got-wild-dogs/

PestSmart Factsheet: Wild dog policy and legislation considerations. Fact sheet on laws and regulations in Australia relating wild dogs. http://www.feral.org.au/wild-dog-policy-and-legislation/

PestSmart Factsheet: Tools and strategies for wild dog management. Fact sheet on methods and strategies for wild dog control. http://www.feral.org.au/tools-and-strategies-for-wild-dog-management/

Soils for Life

The Soils for Life Program

Outcomes Australia’s Soils for Life Program has the principal purpose of enhancing the natural environment through the provision of information and education on innovative leading performance in managing Australia’s natural environment, particularly with a focus on our rural landscape. The Soils for Life Program aims to facilitate positive and sustained change in how the Australian rural landscape is managed to ensure a thriving natural environment for the benefit of all Australians.
Landscape degradation is an issue of national and global concern, as precious resources of soil and water, necessary to sustain life, continue to be lost or degraded. The current state of the Australian natural landscape is further challenged by stresses from changing climate, unsustainable management practices, increased mining activity and urban expansion.

The Soils for Life Program recognises that these many environmental challenges will impact significantly not only on the productivity and viability of agricultural enterprises but also on the health of our environment and the wellbeing of every Australian.

The Soils for Life Program further recognises that the national and global challenges being faced are interrelated and can be best met through a comprehensive coordinated approach focused on improved regenerative environmental and landscape management practices.

The Soils for Life Program addresses the need for improved environmental landscape management through advancing our understanding of the current challenges and identifying leading practice in water use efficiency, building soil health, regeneration of vegetation, enhancing biodiversity, enterprise resilience and profitability and promoting sustainable land-use methods.
Farmers Showing the Way

Soils for Life is focusing on demonstrating, documenting and promoting leading performance in farm-based landscape and water management. To this end, we have established 19 initial case studies across a range of regions and land use types.

Selected case studies were researched and interviewed by the Soils for Life field team between January and June 2012, and these sites are now hosting Field Days as part of our information and demonstration program.

Findings of the case studies highlighted regenerative landscape management practices being applied by innovative farmers, include:

·Using organic composts, fertilisers and bio-amendments;

·Encouraging natural biological cycles and nutrient transfer;

·Implementing time-controlled planned grazing;

·Using grazing practices and animal impact as farm and ecosystem development tools;

·Retaining stubble or performing biological stubble breakdown;

·Constructing interventions in the landscape or waterways to slow or capture the flow of water;

·Fencing off water ways and implementing water reticulation for stock;

·Investing in revegetation;

·Pasture cropping;

·Direct-drill cropping and pasture sowing;

·Changing crop rotations;

·Incorporating green manure or under-sowing of legumes;

·Maximising species diversity;

·Reducing or ceasing synthetic chemical inputs; and

·Integrating farm-based enterprises.

 
 
As a result of adopting these practices, many of these farmers are achieving increased and sustainable production, profit, and improving the health and resilience of their landscape.
 
The full Soils for Life report Innovations for Regenerative Landscape Management and individual case studies are available on the Soils for Life website – http://www.soilsforlife.org.au/

The 'udder' side of ewe selection

AN old-school skill used to identify ewes with wet and dry udders is now available on YouTube as Department of Primary Industry Industries (DPI) researchers take sheep management into the digital age.
 
For more information, see the DPI fact sheet.

Welcome to the Tropical and Subtropical Weeds Research Unit Homepage!

The Tropical and Subtropical Weeds Research Unit is an initiative developed at the University to undertake research into aspects of weed science, provide training in tropical weed science and undertake extension activities 

The Tropical and Subtropical Weeds Research Unit was established in 1999 at the University of Queensland, Australia. It is  located within two schools of the University of Queensland,  the School of Land and Food Sciences (at St Lucia, 8km from the heart of Brisbane City) and the School of Agriculture and Horticulture (at Gatton, 80km west of Brisbane in the heart of the Lockyer Valley).

The TSWRU has access to first-class facilities including a molecular biology laboratory, plant growth and tissue culture facilities, dry and wet laboratories, glasshouses and ample field sites.

It is our aim to conduct excellent and internationally recognised research, teaching and extension practices.

Workplace health and safety codes of practice

Codes of practice state ways to manage exposure to risks.

If a code of practice exists for a risk at your workplace, you must:

  • do what the code says; or
  • adopt another way that identifies and manages exposure to the risk; and
  • take reasonable precautions and exercise due care.

 

Queensland Government

RLF Programme

National Landcare Programme